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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Went down at 50-60 mph on a loose rock and sand road during the Texas Adventure Riders Junction Ride over Memorial Day weekend. The bike and I slid at least 50 feet on its and my left side. The pics tell the tell. The AXP split as you can see in the pic, but otherwise did a good job. The tank is marred a bit, and the fuel petcock knob broke off. Ironically, my Hepco and Becker crash bars, from MotoMachines, arrived at my house 4 hours after I left for the Junction ride. I had ordered those bars 7 weeks prior in expectation of the Junction Ride.
 

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Went down at 50-60 mph on a loose rock and sand road during the Texas Adventure Riders Junction Ride over Memorial Day weekend. The bike and I slid at least 50 feet on its and my left side. The pics tell the tell. The AXP split as you can see in the pic, but otherwise did a good job. The tank is marred a bit, and the fuel petcock knob broke off. Ironically, my Hepco and Becker crash bars, from MotoMachines, arrived at my house 4 hours after I left for the Junction ride. I had ordered those bars 7 weeks prior in expectation of the Junction Ride.
Great to see the AXP did its job protecting your bike.
But the Physics don’t add up. 60mph = 88 feet per second.
Average deceleration of sliding bike is 0.5G
Thus you would have slid ~240 feet if you were going 60mph
And ~60 feet if you were going 30mph
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Damn! The physics have failed us again! Have you considered the possible existence of a road bank into which the tires came to rest or provided resistance along the slide, or any other variables, or maybe that one might have had applied a tourniquet due to a puncture wound and therefore didn’t step off the actual distance to the road bank therefore only guessed at the distance? In short, I’m glad you can do higher level math, excluding using variables, if you haven’t the common courtesy to keep from implying that I’m a liar, when you know almost nothing of that of which you spout, just read and move on.
 

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Damn! The physics have failed us again! Have you considered the possible existence of a road bank into which the tires came to rest or provided resistance along the slide, or any other variables, or maybe that one might have had applied a tourniquet due to a puncture wound and therefore didn’t step off the actual distance to the road bank therefore only guessed at the distance? In short, I’m glad you can do higher level math, excluding using variables, if you haven’t the common courtesy to keep from implying that I’m a liar, when you know almost nothing of that of which you spout, just read and move on.
Now children, play nice! Black99s - thank you for the physics lesson. It was interesting. Jack Subrosa, it is hereby formally acknowledged that not all factors of the crash are known. Also, if you were injured in your physics experiment regarding sliding friction and the durability of 6 mm HDPE skid plates, then I wish to express to you the hope that you healed quickly and fully from your adventures! Also, thank you for sharing your crash with us, and the photos. How did the rest of the bike fare? Can we see pictures of any other damage that was incurred on the slide?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just holes in the left side Wolfman. Already patched and just finished installing the new fuel cock and the crash bars. Fuel cock is the same as the long used KTM fuel cock. And because others have asked if the Hepco and Becker bars fit with the AXP, yes they do. Right side goes on east, but left side not so easy. One must grind down the forward facing edge for the left side of the AXP.
 

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All arguments aside that is an interesting document provided in the link. I see most tests were on pavement but there were two on dirt. The deceleration on dirt in one case was more than double pavement. You stop much quicker. This crash was in sand/gravel so probably stop even quicker. I guess this is why they use gravel traps around race tracks. Interesting anyway. Thanks for providing it.
 

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Damn! The physics have failed us again! Have you considered the possible existence of a road bank into which the tires came to rest or provided resistance along the slide, or any other variables, or maybe that one might have had applied a tourniquet due to a puncture wound and therefore didn’t step off the actual distance to the road bank therefore only guessed at the distance? In short, I’m glad you can do higher level math, excluding using variables, if you haven’t the common courtesy to keep from implying that I’m a liar, when you know almost nothing of that of which you spout, just read and move on.
I though you would get a laugh from my reply. I’ve dumped my bike more than a few times and often thought the speed or height was more than it really was. After you’re bucked off and whilst picking up the beast fueled with adrenaline, reality fades to the background. I teach ADV courses and I’ve seen plenty of dropped bikes.
Seriously, without crash bars, did the 901!fairing escape damage? I imagine the AXP plate and Barkbusters took the majority of the hit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok, apologize. I’m an old warrior. Way too much time in combat. Not a good excuse, but it’s all I got. I had no intention of adding crash bars till I went down in sand two months ago. I I wanted it to remain light. I’ve been an ‘aircraft carrier captain’ (aka GS/GSA guy for 20 rears) until this, and as we all know when that goes down it’s usually resting on a jug or the bars protecting that jug. I was mortified to see that the 901 can come to rest fully on its side, on ‘the plastic’. My first fall Scratched said plastic. I came home and saw, on this forum, that some guy had busted his ‘plastic’. Crash bars are less expensive than replacing that plastic. So I ordered bars and H&B handguards. On this trip, it went down three times. Two on concrete at low water crossings. In all three, the AXP took almost the full blow. Left handguard and bag hit ‘at speed’, but it did not land on the plastic in any of those three falls. So I’ve given in and added ‘weight’ of crash bars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
But as I drink my coffee, it occurred to me that perhaps the reason to upper part of the bike didn’t hit was that I’d just gone over a rise, caught a bit of air, and my worn pirelli scorpions didn’t handle the ‘return to earth’ well. The rear end slid right as I went down. So perhaps the momentum was what kept the upper from impacting. I don’t know, but the upper was unscathed.
 

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I was seriously considering the AXP skid plate...until now. I like the fact that the AXP took most of the blow, I don't like the fact that it split as a result of the crash. Makes it almost disposable. If all you get is one crash and then you have to purchase another (or attempt to repair it), makes me want to wait for something made of metal to be released.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I agree. There were lots of rocks thrown up over the weekend. The AXP took those well. But I never slid it over anything, so no idea of how it will perform in that case. Since the sides of the AXP are made irrelevant now due to the addition of crash bars, I simply cleaned the left side up with a sander, and then used the FlexSeal tape to cover the wound. Actually does look bad. But neither the stock protection, the AXP or the H&B bars make it easy to change oil. Gonna have to remove most of it every 10k miles. I’m not pleased with that.
 

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But neither the stock protection, the AXP or the H&B bars make it easy to change oil. Gonna have to remove most of it every 10k miles. I’m not pleased with that.
That's another issue presenting itself. Finding crash protection that doesn't have to be removed for an oil/filter change. I'm trying to resist taking my bike off-road until I get some crash protection and better tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
This is the first set of Pirellis I’ve ever had. Not bad until this trip. 3200 miles now and she was unusually squirrelly in the rear end all weekend, particularly at speed in sand and gravel. Would like to try the Heidenau K-60 Rangers, but they’re apparently unicorns. The Scouts have always been my go-tos. But may try the Moto-Z Tractionators. A few recommended such this last weekend at the Junction event. Had a bad experience with the Shinkos, and love the TKC-80s, but need more mileage than those provide. I’m in the south, so may go back to the Scouts. They’re too hard for cold weather and my riding habits. Had ‘em on when I lived in Warsaw, and they were dangerously slippery in the cold. But also had TKC-80s there too and they were worse.
 

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This is the first set of Pirellis I’ve ever had. Not bad until this trip. 3200 miles now and she was unusually squirrelly in the rear end all weekend, particularly at speed in sand and gravel. Would like to try the Heidenau K-60 Rangers, but they’re apparently unicorns. The Scouts have always been my go-tos. But may try the Moto-Z Tractionators. A few recommended such this last weekend at the Junction event. Had a bad experience with the Shinkos, and love the TKC-80s, but need more mileage than those provide. I’m in the south, so may go back to the Scouts. They’re too hard for cold weather and my riding habits. Had ‘em on when I lived in Warsaw, and they were dangerously slippery in the cold. But also had TKC-80s there too and they were worse.
There is a recall on TKC-80s. Local guys here in Pacific North West seem to like the Motoz brand. I've been running Mitas E10 on my Africa Twin. Currently with Michelin Anakee Wild which I prefer over the TKC-80.
I've had to keep running my AT for another year - 901 shipments were shorted in January and my deposit was returned, then the bikes that did arrive had blown shocks and other issues. Perhaps next year I'll be on a 901...
 

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I was seriously considering the AXP skid plate...until now. I like the fact that the AXP took most of the blow, I don't like the fact that it split as a result of the crash. Makes it almost disposable. If all you get is one crash and then you have to purchase another (or attempt to repair it), makes me want to wait for something made of metal to be released.
I had a low speed tip over to the left and the plastic weld gave out as well as the side appeared to puncture. I will provide pics once i remove for first oil change. Came away with the same feeling it's a disposable item.
 

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Just holes in the left side Wolfman. Already patched and just finished installing the new fuel cock and the crash bars. Fuel cock is the same as the long used KTM fuel cock. And because others have asked if the Hepco and Becker bars fit with the AXP, yes they do. Right side goes on east, but left side not so easy. One must grind down the forward facing edge for the left side of the AXP.
Are you missing the two top bolts on front of skid and H&B bars?
 
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